The Prose and Poetic Eddas - important aspects of learning about the Gods, the Runes and the Rituals of the Teutonic Nations and their Magic


One of the most important aspects of learning about the Gods, the Runes and the Rituals of the Teutonic Nations and their Magic is the Prose and Poetic Eddas. Amongst these the Havamal is among the most well known. HAVAMAL or The Words of the Wise One.
Hávamál is the longest Eddic poem, containing 164 verses.
Hávamál is found only in the Codex Regius manuscript, first discovered in 1643, where it occurs as the second poem, immediately after Völuspá 
Hávamál is commonly considered to be a composite composition, formed from at least three and as many as six, independent poetic works compiled together by an editor.
In 1891, Karl Müllenhoff suggested that Hávamál consisted of six poems, whose only common feature was that Odin was the speaker in all of them. These six poems, identified by stanza numbers, are:
I. 1-79 (or later): The Gnomic Poem
II. 95 (or earlier)-102: Odin's adventures with Billing's girl
III. 103 (or 104)-110: Odin's adventure with Gunnlöd
IV. 111 (or 112)-137: Loddfáfnismál
V. 138-145: Rúnatal, The 'list of secrets'
VI. 146-163: Ljóðatal, The 'list of magic songs'

Attached is a picture of the page which contains, arguably, one of the most famous of all the Rune texts - The List of Secrets ( Runatal)

Reference: Germanic Mythology: Texts, Translations, Leanerships


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